Nine Reasons to Own Solid Gold

Nine Rea­sons to Own Solid Gold

 

When you shop for jew­elry on-line, look at the descrip­tions care­fully to see whether the item is solid gold or plated.  Some­times a piece described as gold in the title turns out to be  “gold tone,” or “gold plated.”   The for­mer means that the piece “looks like” gold, but has no gold at all.  “Plated” means that a thin layer of gold is deposited on top of an under­ly­ing metal like brass or steel.

Lately I’ve noticed an increas­ing trend of some big-name web­sites offer­ing plated or “gold tone” jew­elry by famous design­ers with some sur­pris­ingly high prices attached. I want to make a case for buy­ing solid gold instead.  Here are nine rea­sons for doing so:

  1. Solid gold, though more expen­sive ini­tially, holds its value over time.
  2. With solid gold, you imme­di­ately get back part of what you paid in the form of gold metal, whereas there is lit­tle or no intrin­sic value in a plated piece.
  3. Solid gold lasts for­ever; plated jew­elry has lim­ited durability.
  4. Solid gold can be recy­cled; plated jew­elry becomes junk in the landfill.
  5. Solid gold feels “real,” prob­a­bly because you know it is.
  6. Plated or “gold tone” jew­elry looks cheap and doesn’t last.
  7. Plated gold, by def­i­n­i­tion super­fi­cial, sends that message.
  8. Solid gold sends a mes­sage of solid­ity and authenticity.
  9. Jew­elry made of solid gold may not be as trendy and glitzy as some plated items but it trans­mits an aura of sophis­ti­cated ele­gance that is beyond trendy.
This is what real gold looks like

This is what real gold looks like

Remem­ber:  the jew­elry that you wear says a lot about you.  The best advice I can give you is to buy solid metal, gold or sil­ver, and jew­elry made by a per­son, not a machine. In the long-term it’s the wis­est and best choice–and more eco­nom­i­cal too.

Ricco has made such jew­elry since 1970.  Check out at my online store

 

18K Gold Bracelet, Large Size">18K Gold Bracelet, Large Size

Hey, what about the rest of us?

I can’t count the times a poten­tial cus­tomer has come into my gallery, looked around and said sadly:” I’m sure you won’t have any­thing in my size.”

Peo­ple come in all sizes, but jew­elry is mainly found in mid-range sizes, mak­ing it hard to find a fit if you are either larger or smaller than aver­age.  If you’re a larger per­son, the jew­elry that you often find is light weight or del­i­cate which makes it dou­bly unsuit­able for you.  This is espe­cially true for the pro­fes­sional woman for whom the right jew­elry is essen­tial to her image.

Not sur­pris­ingly, man­u­fac­tur­ers make jew­elry mostly in mid­dle sizes in order to max­i­mize sales, espe­cially so for fine jew­elry designs made in gold.  This leaves the rest of us out.

Over the years, Ricco has made  larger and smaller ver­sions of some designs and has noted the delight that peo­ple show on find­ing a nice design in their size.  “Finally, some­thing nice that fits!” is typ­i­cally heard.

In the future, Ricco will offer fine jew­elry more often for hard-to-find sizes.  Spread the word: the rest of us will served!

Also, Ricco will custom-make a design  to your exact size on request.

This large heavy 18K gold bracelet is an example.

Substantial 18K Gold Bracelet for Large Wrist

Sub­stan­tial 18K Gold Bracelet for Large Wrist

  • Solid 18K yel­low gold 45 grams
  • 3/8 inch wide by 1/16 inch thick
  • 8 to 9 inches diameter
  • Signed with maker’s mark (Ricco) and qual­ity stamped 18K
  • Comes with signed cer­tifi­cate guarantee
  • Uni­sex design suit­able for man or woman

Buy it here on Square Market

Lost Earring Blues

Ear­ring Wires—Options and Choices

Ear­rings are typ­i­cally worn as match­ing pairs, so if you lose one you’re out of luck and that’s a shame.  For this rea­son it’s impor­tant to know about the pros and cons of ear­ring wires and how they attach to the ear.  Here’s a run­down on some com­mon types:

French Wire or Shep­herd Hook

Keeper for French Wire

Keeper for French Wire

French wires are pop­u­lar because they are easy to insert into the ear.  But easy in also means easy out.  One way to pre­vent these wires from slip­ping out is with a small plas­tic keeper that slips on the end of the wire, as pic­tured, but some don’t like how this looks. Not­ing the angle of the pic­tured hook you can see that it won’t take much for this wire to slip out unless you put on a keeper.

 

Post and Clutch  (Push Back)

Post and Clutch Earwire

Post and Clutch Earwire

Post ear­ring wires and backs are another very com­mon choice. They are quite secure as long as the back (aka ear­ring nut, but­ter­fly clutch) keeps its spring ten­sion.  If the backs wear out or get deformed, the ear­ring can eas­ily slip out of the ear.  Be sure to put the back on straight; align­ment is impor­tant with this type of closure.

Posts come in a num­ber of sizes, some longer than oth­ers, some thicker too.  Mak­ers some­times use very flimsy posts and backs to save money.  These can wear out quickly, so be sure to look care­fully at this fea­ture.  Some backs are tiny, mak­ing them hard to put on, but there are other options like jumbo backs or mechan­i­cal backs that have springs.  Just one set of those will serve for all your ear­rings, so though they cost a lit­tle extra to buy, they are worth it to avoid los­ing favorite or valu­able ear­rings.  Just search Google for “ear­ring backs.”

Other Options

Lever Back Earring Findings

Lever Back Ear­ring Findings

Other options include lever­backs, screw­backs, and clips.  Clips can have a post or just a spring-tension wire that presses on the ear lobe (omega clip.)  Clips with­out wires are for unpierced ears.  The down­side is that they must press on the lobe with enough force to keep them on and too much force is painful over time.  Screw­backs are secure but take time to put on and remove.  Be care­ful to put these on straight or the threads can become dam­aged. Lever­backs have spring-loaded clo­sures that are easy to put on and they are secure as long as they keep their shape.  Some are on the flimsy side, but they will last if you take care.

Feed­back Time

Ricco would appre­ci­ate feed­back about the type of ear­ring attach­ment you nor­mally pre­fer and the rea­sons for that pref­er­ence.  Do you own some of the types men­tioned above?  Have you lost ear­rings?  How do you lose them (in what way, do you sup­pose?)  Do you have a par­tic­u­lar lost ear­ring sad story?  Any com­ments about ear­rings are appre­ci­ated.  Leave com­ments here or on my Face­book page by click­ing the icon here or send me an email at ricco@riccogallery.com.  Thanks!

18K Gold Hand Sculpted Cuff Bracelet">18K Gold Hand Sculpted Cuff Bracelet

Tres chic, non?

Tres chic, non?

This is my lat­est addi­tion to the solid gold bracelets col­lec­tion posted before.

Sim­ple, ele­gant design with hand-sculpted sleek lines giv­ing a clas­sic look that is timeless.

Dimen­sions are:  6mm wide (1/4 inch) by 2mm thick (very substantial.)

Comes with signed cer­tifi­cate war­rant­ing metal qual­ity and authorship.

Orig­i­nal design copy­right Ricco 2014

Rea­son­ably priced.  Check it out at my online store on Square Market

Solid Gold Cuff Bracelets

A lot to choose from!

A lot to choose from!

Wide cuffs in 14K Yel­low Gold, 18K Pal­la­dium White Gold, and 22K gold are 1 inch wide and range in size from small to large.

Nar­row cuffs are 18K Pal­la­dium White gold and 18K Yel­low Gold in the same range of sizes.

Note the dif­fer­ences in color from the 14K cuff at the bot­tom to the 22K cuff at the top with the 18K yel­low in between.

See these bracelets at my ONLINE STORE

18K Gold Hoop Earrings with Pearl Drops">18K Gold Hoop Earrings with Pearl Drops

Stunning Original Design

Stun­ning Orig­i­nal Design

These are orig­i­nal design ear­rings by Ricco copy­right 2014.

Ver­sa­tile design has remov­able bot­tom drops that snap into loops on the bot­tom of the hoops.  Any ear­rings with this type of ring can be attached to the snap in loops, so this is a great feature.

The hoops are sub­stan­tial, about 1/16 inch thick, but not too heavy either.

The drops are about 1/2 inch diam­e­ter and have con­cave cen­ters that mag­nify dainty white pearls cen­tered in the cups.

Buy them on Square Market

18K Gold Cap">Drop Pearl Pendant with 18K Gold Cap

Sweet and Petite

Sweet and Petite

Sweet and petite min­i­mal­ist design with volup­tuous drop pearl.  Orig­i­nal design by Ricco copy­right 2014.  Ele­gantly simple–sometimes the most exquis­ite designs have the least orna­ment. And some­times they’re the hard­est to find.

Buy it HERE

Sweet and Petite

Sweet and Petite

18K Gold Pen­dant with Drop Pearl on Square Market

18K Gold Earrings with Mabe Pearls">18K Gold Earrings with Mabe Pearls

Mabe Pearls in 18K Gold Frames

Mabe Pearls in 18K Gold Frames

Ricco Orig­i­nal Design 18K gold frames enhance these 17mm Mabe pearls beau­ti­fully.  Evoca­tive of moon sym­bol­ism, the cir­cle within a cir­cle is a per­fect com­ple­ment to the fem­i­nine rounded shapes of the pearls.

Avail­able to buy online here 18K Gold Ear­rings with Mabe Pearls on Square Market

18K Gold Studs with Pearls">18K Gold Studs with Pearls

Pearls in nests

Pearls in nests

Side view

Side view

 Just cre­ated: new orig­i­nal design to show­case 6.5 mm fresh­wa­ter pearls.  Pearls nested in con­cave hemi­spher­i­cal cups pro­duce a halo of gold around them.  Side view shows that the studs come off the ear­lobe with some height, lend­ing sub­stance to the form and pro­tect­ing the pearl.

A beau­ti­ful and very effec­tive design if I don’t say so myself.  Design copy­righted:  Ricco 2014.

Buy them from my online store.

18K Gold Studs with Pearls on Square Market

Why Palladium White Gold

18K Palladium White Gold Hoop Earrings

18K Pal­la­dium White Gold Hoop Earrings

What is white gold and what is pal­la­dium white gold?

In its pure form, gold is yel­low. So how do you make it change to white?  You mix pure gold with another metal, a white metal.

A mix of met­als is an alloy.  To make a white gold alloy, mak­ers can use either pal­la­dium, a noble metal, or nickel, a base metal.  Since pal­la­dium costs $900 an ounce while nickel costs 9 dol­lars a pound,  most white gold jew­elry uses nickel.

Using nickel in the alloy can have con­se­quences:  it pro­duces an aller­gic reac­tion in some peo­ple; the alloy is brit­tle may develop cracks; the prongs around stone set­tings can break off, espe­cially for those who spend a lot of time in chlo­ri­nated pools (the chlo­rine leaches nickel out of the metal.)  So, if you own white gold jew­elry with prong set stones, it’s a good idea to visu­ally check the prongs occa­sion­ally.  For more details, see this arti­cle.

This is why Ricco white gold jew­elry uses pal­la­dium alloys. It reflects an under­ly­ing phi­los­o­phy that you can do things cheaply or you can do them right, and my choice is always to do the best I can with qual­ity mate­ri­als and processes.  Details the buyer may be unaware of  are impor­tant to me since I want my jew­elry to endure in time.

See my work at my online store and the ear­rings in the pic­ture here.